MIT5312: Systems Analysis and Design
Spring, 200
7
 

Hospital Management Systems & Software

Leading Hospital Management Software Systems Gathered from Across the Internet

Patient's lives depend on doctors having the right information at the right time - don't take chances with your patients.  Get the automated data solutions your hospital, clinic or medical office needs now!

Hospital productivity improvements necessitate automation via hospital management software systems.  Accuracy, timeliness and efficiency are key factors in determining if your hospital will keep up with the cycles of Medicare and insurance company reimbursement reductions.

http://www.med.usf.edu/CLASS/his.htm

Hospital Information System

 

An ideal hospital information system design should be focused on integration of clinical as well as financial and administrative applications. At present time, most systems are Financial Information Systems (FIS), some are Management Information Systems (MIS), and some Hospital Information Systems combine FIS and MIS. In order to improve hospital services in a time-efficient and cost-effective manner, both FIS and MIS must be linked to a Clinical Information Systems (CIS). This system is centered around patients and clinical processes and consists of: ward-related Nursing Information Systems (NIS), and the non-ward Departmental Information Systems (DIS). Examples of DIS are Radiology Information Systems (RIS), and Pharmacy Information Systems (PIS). With such synergy, the key issue is the integration of digital data so that the authorized personnel can retrieve necessary information anywhere and anytime they need it. The required data are usually different in nature and are called multimedia data. To review a patient's record the healthcare provider may need to look at radiographic images, listen to voice data with video sequence and live signals (intensive care scenario), and read the notes of other physicians. It is in this context when there is also a need for integration of HIS with Integrated Digital Medical Records (IDMR) and other advance information systems such as Picture Archiving Communication System (PACS) and Document Information Systems (Doc IS) to handle massive amounts of multimedia data. In Summary, in an ideal situation IDMR would be the center of Hospital Information System, and the presentation of various categories of essential data would be an automatic function geared to the needs of an authorizes user.

 

 

 

 

Evolving Technology for Physician Practices

 

http://www.keymedical.net/PMpage.html

 

KeyMedical’s Practice Management Suite is the 20-year evolution of four
physician information systems which as been refined and updated to
accommodate today’s physician practices. Combining the most up-to-date
computer architecture with the ease of the Internet, this program is designed to
run on the Microsoft Windows 2000/XP platform and built to help safeguard
confidential patient information, KeyMedical Software offers  the most effective
and economical Physician Practice Management software available.

KeyMedical’s Suite of Products

o            Complete Electronic Medical Records (EMR) system

o            Patient Account Information

o            Transaction Processing

o            Electronic Claims (Direct Submission to Medicare and BCBS)

o            Financial and Billing Management

o            Comprehensive Reporting

o            Managed Care Administration

o            Custom “home page” designed for the individual user



KeyMed’s Patient Account Screen

o            Insurance verification

o            Update plan membership

o            Benefits and co-pay determination for patients

o            Review charges, payments and adjustments at the individual and
family/group billing level


…All from a Single Screen


The KeyMed™ Practice Management System

o            Patient tree view

o            Integrated Patient Document Management System utilizing                

o            scanning (great for  scanning patient insurance cards)

o            Microsoft Word and Excel capabilities

o            Case Management

o            Resource appointment scheduling

o            Automatic tracking and calculation of surgical global days

o            Referral authorization tracking

o            Online Unlimited user-defined data fields with reporting

o            Referring physician reports

o            Automated paperless collections capabilities for insurance and
personal balances.

 

 

 

Home       Contact Us      Career Opportunities
Copyright © 2006, KeyMedical Software, Inc., all rights reserved.
An equal opportunity employer.
KeyMedical Software, Inc., Lebanon, IN 46052 USA, 1-888-9KEYMED

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

KeyMed™ Practice
Management

Account
Information/Patient
Demographics

Appointment
Scheduler

Billing/Posting

The Complete Ophthalmology Software Solution for Your Practice

setstats1

 

The following sites provide more information about Hospital Information Sytems:

Healthcare Information Management Systems Society

The following are a list of Hospitals on World Wide Web.

Saint George Hospital- Sydney, Austrailia

Queen Mary Hospital-Hong Kong

Radford Community Hospital-New River Valley, VA

Rouen University Hospital-France

Royal Free Hospital-London, UK

Royal Marsden Hospital-London, UK

Saint John Medical Center-Tulsa,OK

Hospital Web

The Virtual Hospital

HEALTH CUMUNITY SMART CARD(http://www.health-infosys-dir.com/yphchis.asp)helps healthcare providers build patient relationships and loyalty, increase process efficiencies, improve clinical outcomes and comply with HIPAA. Patient Smart Cards carry clinical and administrative data, including patient demographics, physician and insurance information, medical history, emergency records, current and historic physician orders, as well as any custom data. Portable data from Patient Smart Card may be used at every step of healthcare workflow, including ADT/Registration, ER/Ambulance, self-service kiosks, physician offices, clinical departments and pharmacies/retailers. Member management modules support a variety of patient relationship functions (PRM/CRM), including administration and tracking of affinity programs, points, rewards and events, as well as a patient self-service portal. The solution supports automatic patient registration with smart card as well as computerized physician order entry (CPOE), and may be integrated with a variety of existing ADT/Registration, EMR, CPOE and PRM/CRM systems.

For more information please visit our website.

       

 


Engage Community. Inspire Loyalty. http://www.aquave.com/solutions_care_provider.htm

Healthcare consumerization is here. Patients demand more and you have to deliver it with less. Our health community solutions engage patients and increase their satisfaction, while effecting significant savings and clinical improvements.

 

Benefits for Providers

Smart Card affinity program creates a bond between you and your patients, driving revenue and profitability. It also reduces costs by streamlining clinical and administrative workflow.

*       Engaged and Loyal Patient Community

*       Up-To-Date Portable Medical Records

*       Target Programs by Segment/Department

*       Continuous Relationship Management

*       Connect to Regional Provider Networks

*       Improve Revenue Cycle & Collections

*       Increase Service Efficiency, Reduce Costs

Benefits for Patients

Smart Card constantly reminds your patients how much you value them. It makes a difference in their interaction experience with you every day and could save their lives.

*       Piece of Mind in Case of Emergency

*       Protect Your Family and Your Loved Ones

*       It Speaks For You/Them, When You Cannot

*       Fast and Personalized "Red Carpet" Experience

*       Greater Convenience, Less Paperwork

*       Manage/Control Your Own Health Data

*       Avoid Preventable Medical Errors

Patient Smart Card Content

Patient Smart Cards carry clinical and administrative data, most relevant at every step of healthcare workflow. We provide standard data elements out-of-the-box and can easily configure / customize them as required.

 

Patient Profile

Medical Record

Physician Orders

▪ Demographics
▪ Physicians
▪ Insurance
▪ Contacts
▪ Preferences

▪ Conditions
▪ Allergies
▪ Surgeries
▪ Immunizations
▪ Medications

▪ e-Prescriptions
▪ e-Appointments
▪ e-Procedures
▪ Lab Test Results
▪ Advance Directives

PLUS: Any Custom Fields or Field Groups

 

Smart Card Reader Locations

Portable Smart Card data can be read, written and processed in any location with installed readers and software. Our solution includes pre-configured packages for most common install sites, and can be easily extended as needed.

 

Inside Your Facility

Outside of Your Facility

▪ PFS/Admissions
▪ Emergency Room
▪ Internal Physician Offices
▪ Clinical Departments
▪ Self-Service Kiosks

▪ Ambulances
▪ Remote Physician Offices
▪ Outpatient Clinics
▪ Pharmacies/Retailers
▪ Self-Service Kiosks

PLUS: Any Custom Reader/User Configuration

 

System Interfaces

Aquave can exchange data with existing systems through a flexible interface architecture. We support basic import / export of data and sophisticated process-driven integration in real time, for example for eligibility verification.

 

Existing System

Interfaces / Standards

▪ ADT / Scheduling
▪ Eligibility Verification
▪ Medical Records
▪ Marketing & Call Center
▪ Custom Databases or Files

▪ HL7, HIPAA, SQL, Custom
▪ HIPAA, Custom
▪ HL7, SQL, Custom
▪ SQL, Custom
▪ SQL, Custom

PLUS: Any Custom System/Interface Integration

 

CRM & Administrative Tools

We provide flexible functionality to help your marketing and admission staff manage patient experience and community program settings. The system also includes patient self-service tools, that can help you reduce servicing costs.

*       Rapid Registration

*       Patient/Member Tracking

*       Patient/Member Self-Service Portal

*       Permission-Based Marketing

*       Program & Event Management

*       Affinity Points and Rewards

*       Card Issuance & Management

*       Online and Offline Processing

*       Flexible Report Generation

*       HIPAA Consent Management

Further Information

*       Experience Software In Action

*       Smart Cards in Healthcare (PDF Brochure)

*       Build vs. Buy Comparison (PDF Table)

To learn about our health community solutions and arrange a demo please contact us.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Builder UK > White Papers > Smart Cards


 

Web-Enabled Smart Card for Ubiquitous Access of Patient's Medical Record(http://uk.builder.com/whitepapers/0,39026692,60019039p-39000894q,00.htm)

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The combined benefits of smart card to support mobility in a pocket coupled with the ubiquitous access of web technology, presents a new paradigm for medical information access system. The paper describes the framework of Java Card Web Servlet (JCWS) that is being developed to provide seamless access interface between a web browser and a Java enabled smart card. Importantly, the smart card is viewed as a mobile repository of web objects comprising of html pages, medical data objects and, record browsing and updating applet. As the patient moves between hospitals, clinics and countries, the mobility of the smart card database dynamically binds to the JCWS framework to facilitate a truly ubiquitous access and updating of medical information via a standard web browser interface.
 

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FW: Researchers Seek Backers for Medical Smart Card(http://lists.justnet.info/pipermail/apf-test00/2001q3/002884.html)

Meredith Carter m.carter at latrobe.edu.au
Sun Jul 22 19:43:42 EST 2001

bulletPrevious message: [LINK] reverse directories back in the news
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This is interesting but not as novel as it might sound at first. A similar 
prototype was trialled by a group of pharmacists and GP's and theoretically 
at least Dandenong Hospital a couple of years ago - a project sponsored by 
Dept of Human Services Vic and Dept of Health & Aged Care. Some members of 
CHF and padvocacy were on the consumer and privacy reference group.
 It was not followed up for a range of reasons including the lack of 
computer savvy amongst GPs and pharmacists but was apparently quite well 
accepted by the consumers who agreeed to participate. However 2 issues 
should be noted about these things. One is that they require a consumer to 
have a "home" GP whereas many people have several doctors who take the lead 
for different issues (eg family planning might be one GP and workcover 
claim another and chronic illness someone else again - quite often a 
specialist rather than a GP). It will be interesting to see how smart card 
technology including back up mechanisms eventually deal with this. An 
alternative policy position favoured by some is that this use of multiple 
doctors should be discouraged and we should all be required to enrol with a 
particular GP as they do in the UK and some parts of Europe.
The other issue is a clinical one. A frequently claimed advantage of smart 
cards is their utility in an emergency. This is something that many 
clinicians dispute. For eg if someone comes into emergency unconscious 
there will be no assumption made that a smart card on their person actually 
relates to them or that it is up to date (assuming also that it will even 
be looked for in an emergency, can be found quickly, and there is time to 
read and find relevant contents). The NZ experience with their unique 
identifier and medical warning sysstem raises similar issues. This is not 
to say that a card revealing a patients allergies etc  might well be useful 
once those dealing with the emergency have taken all the immediate steps 
required under protocols for treating unconscious patients.
regards
Meredith Carter
Executive Director
Health Issues Centre
Ph 03 9479 5827
Fax 03 9479 5977
Email m.carter at latrobe.edu.au
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From:   Rachel Stephen-Smith [SMTP:r.stephen_smith at chf.org.au]
Sent:   Friday, July 20, 2001 2:43 PM
To:     ehealth chat list (E-mail); ehealth strategic group list (E-mail)
Subject:       FW: FW: Researchers Seek Backers for Medical Smart Card
 
Apologies for cross postings!
 
-----Original Message-----
From:
 
Sent: Friday, 20 July 2001 2:08 PM
To:
Cc:
Subject: Fwd: FW: Researchers Seek Backers for Medical Smart Card
 
 
 
Karen Dearne (who writes lots of privacy stories in the Oz) brought
this media release to my attention - a locally-grown wannabe health
card.
 
 
>From: Rebecca Monk [mailto:media-services at newcastle.edu.au]
>Sent: Monday, 16 July 2001 1:10
>To: rmonk at mail.newcastle.edu.au
>Subject: Researchers Seek Backers for Medical Smart Card
> 
> 
>MEDIA RELEASE      ****PHOTO ATTACHED - captions for photos below ******
> 
>Monday 16th July 2001
> 
>Researchers Seek Backers for Medical Smart Card
> 
>Software engineering researchers at the University of Newcastle have
>developed a 'smart card' that can hold a person's entire medical history 
on
>a piece of plastic the size of a credit card.
> 
>The researchers say their card could revolutionise health care and they 
are
>looking for a company to take over the commercial development of the
>successful prototype.
>The card, which they call MoReHealth (Mobile Records for better Health), 
is
>a miniature computer with memory and processor.
> 
>It stores medical history so that a doctor or hospital anywhere in the
>world has ready access to a patient's record by the simple use of a smart
>card reader and a desktop PC with MoReHealth software.
> 
>The card has in-built privacy shields and tiered access so that 
pharmacists
>can read prescription records, but not the medical records available to a
>doctor or hospital. The card stores up to 512 health records and 512
>prescription records. Losing the card does not mean losing the records
>because data can be automatically backed up with the "home" doctor 
 through
>the Internet.
> 
>The designers, from the University's Software Precision Engineering
>Laboratory, are Associate Professor A.S.M. Sajeev, Michael Quinlan, a PhD
>student, and Kyungmi Lee, who is studying for her Master's Degree. Both
>students are undertaking research on Micro-Mobile Systems.
> 
>Explaining how the card would be used Michael says: "Imagine a person
>develops back problems that could result from a previous accident say in
>Switzerland. The patient's current doctor wants the exact details of the
>accident, not a patient's hazy recollections. The card would recall what
>the Swiss doctor wrote in the patient's file when the accident occurred.
> 
>"Similarly a person involved in an accident is rushed to hospital 
seriously
>injured and unconscious. The smart card would instantly tell the person's
>blood group, allergies, medical problems and medication."
> 
>Enquiries and interview: Associate Professor A.S.M. Sajeev on 4921 8975 
(W)
>or 4957 8714 (H).
 
--
Roger Clarke              http://www.anu.edu.au/people/Roger.Clarke/
 
Xamax Consultancy Pty Ltd, 78 Sidaway St, Chapman ACT 2611 AUSTRALIA
                 Tel: +61 2 6288 1472, and 6288 6916
mailto:Roger.Clarke at xamax.com.au            http://www.xamax.com.au/
 
Visiting Fellow                       Department of Computer Science
The Australian National University     Canberra  ACT  0200 AUSTRALIA
Information Sciences Building Room 211       Tel:  +61  2  6125 3666
_______________________________________________
To be removed from the padvocacy mail list visit:
http://lists.efa.org.au/mailman/listinfo/padvocacy#unsubscribe
 
_______________________________________________
To be removed from the padvocacy mail list visit:
http://lists.efa.org.au/mailman/listinfo/padvocacy#unsubscribe
 
 

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Computer Networks
Volume 31, Issues 11-16 , 17 May 1999, Pages 1591-1598


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doi:10.1016/S1389-1286(99)00056-0    How to Cite or Link Using DOI (Opens New Window)  
Copyright © 1999 Published by Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

Web-enabled smart card for ubiquitous access of patient's medical record

Alvin T. S. Chan*

Internet Computing and Electronic Commerce Laboratory, Department of Computing, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong, People's Republic of China

Available online 3 May 2000.
 

Abstract

The combined benefits of smart card to support mobility in a pocket coupled with the ubiquitous access of Web technology, present a new paradigm for medical information access systems. The paper describes the framework of Java Card Web Servlet (JCWS) that is being developed to provide seamless access interface between a Web browser and a Java-enabled smart card. Importantly, the smart card is viewed as a mobile repository of Web objects comprised of HTML pages, medical data objects, and record browsing and updating applet. As the patient moves between hospitals, clinics and countries, the mobility of the smart-card database dynamically binds to the JCWS framework to facilitate a truly ubiquitous access and updating of medical information via a standard Web-browser interface.

Author Keywords: Smart card; Web; Medical; Health

 

*E-mail: cstschan@comp.polyu.edu.hk


 

 

 

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United States Patent Application

20030037065

Kind Code

A1

Svab, Alena

February 20, 2003

Method and apparatus for using medical ID smart card

Abstract

A personalized smart card is encoded with medical patient information, including patient identification, and a Uniform Resource Locator (URL) of an insurance provider's and/or pharmaceutical service provider's extranet or a web site to facilitate health care insurance transactions and administration. In one implementation, a computer-implemented method uses such a smart card to provide digital ID, data storage and automatic navigation to a web or extranet site and/or issuer database. An authorized member of medical, health or other organization inserts the smart card into a smart card reader that is connected to a computer or other computing device capable of accessing the web, extranet or a targeted database. An exchange of an encryption formula, card media vs. reader/writer occurs prior to a response from the system host device. After encryption is verified, an access to the particular server is allowed. In response to the insertion of the smart card into the smart card reader, an issuer specific program and/or a browser is launched. As a result, the authorized user may automatically navigate to the targeted site simply by inserting the smart card into the smart card reader, without having to type any information, use the computer's mouse, or provide any other user input.

Inventors:

Svab, Alena; (Wayne, NJ)

Correspondence Name and Address:

    BIRCH STEWART KOLASCH & BIRCH

    PO BOX 747

    FALLS CHURCH

    VA

    22040-0747

    US

Serial No.:

207204

Series Code:

10

Filed:

July 30, 2002

 

U.S. Current Class:

707/104.1

U.S. Class at Publication:

707/104.1

Intern'l Class:

G06F 007/00

Claims



What is claimed is:

1. A computer-implemented method comprising steps of: (A) storing, writing and encoding data related to a health insurance customer/subscriber onto a portable computer-readable medium, as well as, retrieving a Uniform Resource Locator from said portable computer-readable medium; and (B) reviewing stored media data and navigating a web browser to a data base or a web site that provides medical insurance and/or pharmaceutical service information for said health insurance customer/subscriber without requiring user input.

2. The method of claim 1, wherein the portable computer-readable medium is a medical ID smart card

3. The method of claim 2, wherein the medical ID smart card includes a contactless integrated circuit chip with a coil antenna formed directly on a surface of the chip.

4. The method of claim 1, further comprising steps of: (C) detecting accessibility of the portable computer-readable medium to a device for accessing the portable computer-readable medium; and (D) performing the steps (A) and (B) in response to said detection.

5. The method of claim 1, further comprising a step of: (C) reading additional information from the portable computer-readable medium; and (D) transmitting the additional information to the web or extranet site.

6. The method of claim 5, wherein the step (C) comprises a step of reading information descriptive of a user of the portable computer-readable medium from the portable computer-readable medium.

7. The method of claim 6, wherein the information descriptive of the user involves a user name.

8. The method of claim 7, further comprising a step of: (E) providing the user name to a database or a web site without requiring user input.

9. The method of claim 6, further comprising steps of: (E) determining whether the user has access privileges to the web or extranet site based on the information descriptive of the user; (F) granting the user access to the web site if the user has access privileges to the web site; and (G) denying the user access to the web site if the user does not have access privileges to the web site.

10. The method of claim 6, wherein the information descriptive of the user comprises medical data provided by the web or extranet site.

11. The method of claim 6, further comprising steps of: (E) selecting content to display to the user based on the information descriptive of the user; and (F) displaying the selected content to the user.

12. The method of claim 5, further comprising a step of: (E) modifying the additional information on the portable computer-readable medium.

13. An apparatus comprising: means for retrieving permanently and temporarily stored data relating to a medical insurance customer/subscriber and a Uniform Resource Locator from a portable computer-readable medium; and means for navigating to a certain database and/or a web browser to a web site specified by the Uniform Resource Locator that provides medical insurance and/or pharmaceutical service information for said health insurance customer/subscriber without requiring user input.

14. The apparatus of claim 13, wherein the portable computer-readable medium is a smart card.

15. The apparatus of claim 14, wherein said smart card includes a contactless integrated circuit chip with a coil antenna formed directly on a surface of the chip.

16. The apparatus of claim 13, further comprising: means for detecting accessibility of the portable computer-readable medium to a device for accessing the portable computer-readable medium; and means for performing the steps (A) and (B) in response to said detection.

17. The apparatus of claim 13, further comprising: means for reading additional information from the portable computer-readable medium; and means for transmitting the additional information to the web site.

18. The apparatus of claim 15, wherein said smart card includes a second contactless integrated circuit chip with a coil antenna formed directly on a surface of the chip.

19. The method of claim 3, wherein the medical ID smart card includes a second contactless integrated circuit chip with a coil antenna formed directly on a surface of the chip.

Description



CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

[0001] This application claims priority under 35 U.S.C. .sctn.119(e) of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/308,106 filed on Jul. 30, 2001, the entire contents of which are herein incorporated by reference.

BACKGROUND

[0002] 1. Field of the Invention

[0003] The present invention relates to techniques for medical identification, health care administration, and pharmaceutical services. More particularly, the present invention relates to a technique for using a smart card to identify a patient and navigate to a health insurance provider's and/or a pharmaceutical service provider's extranet (web site for targeted users) or a regular public web site for medical insurance coverage details and/or pharmaceutical services, as well as encoding vital personal data to the card media. The invention has particular significance and applicability to the U.S. healthcare system, but is also suitable for global applications.

[0004] 2. Background Information

[0005] The majority of the U.S. population has some form of medical insurance coverage, which covers and pays for most all medical treatments and services. The typical medical insurance coverage transaction involves payment of a doctor's and/or hospital's bills after the actual treatment and/or service has been provided. The process and currently used system causes myriad problems and issues regarding pending payments, validity of the medical coverage, etc.

[0006] Typically, medical organizations periodically issue their customers/members a PVC card on which phone numbers and the address of the issuance provider are printed. At present, medical insurance providers in the U.S. communicate with physicians, hospitals and pharmacies about coverage, payments and or other issues mostly via telephone, faxes and hard copy letters. Most interchange of patient information, payment issues, coverage and related topics are "off line." An organization providing the medical treatment, pharmaceutical distribution, and health service usually calls the provider for verification. Some information is directly printed on the card. This, however, is forgeable and validity of the ID card is difficult. Regulations of HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act), the ruling U.S. agency in the health and medical regulatory sector, instruct all medical offices to be online compatible by October 2002. Thus, the need exists for techniques that effectively and efficiently modernize health care insurance/pharmaceutical transactions and administration.

SUMMARY

[0007] According to the present invention, a personalized smart card is encoded with patient information, including identification information, and a Uniform Resource Locator (URL) of an insurance provider's and/or pharmaceutical service provider's extranet or a web site to facilitate health care insurance/pharmaceutical transactions and administration. According to an aspect of the present invention, a computer-implemented method uses such a personalized smart card to navigate to an insurance provider's and/or pharmaceutical service provider's extranet or a web site to provide users (e.g., physicians, nurses, hospitals, pharmacies, etc.) with an easy way to access, verify, and update information needed to determine insurance coverage and other patient information and to accurately determine/submit pharmaceutical prescriptions. In one implementation of the present invention, the personalized smart card contains one or more integrated circuit chips with a computer-readable memory that is encoded with a patient's vital statistics and a URL of an insurance provider's and/or a pharmaceutical service provider's extranet or a web site.

[0008] In one implementation of the present invention, the user (e.g., doctor, nurse, hospital, pharmacy, etc.) inserts the medical ID smart card into a smart card reader that is connected to a computer or other computing device capable of accessing the public web or a private extranet. In response to the insertion of the smart card into the smart card reader, application specific software is launched. The program immediately displays important medical statistics of the patient. Web browser or extranet browser software is launched to automatically navigate to the medical insurance provider's and/or pharmaceutical service provider's URL or an extranet site. When the browser is launched to navigate to a medical insurance provider's URL/extranet site, the medical insurance provider's policy, rules, and coverage are posted. When the browser is launched to navigate to a pharmaceutical service provider's URL, the user may access information indicating, e.g., which medications are covered by the patient's insurance, the patient's pharmaceutical history, potential interactions/adverse affects of different drugs, whether a medication covered by the patient's health care plan may be substituted for the one the physician plans to prescribe, etc., and/or to electronically submit a pharmaceutical prescription.

[0009] In accordance with the present invention, the user may automatically review data and navigate to the encoded URL simply by inserting the smart card into the smart card reader, without having to type any information, use the computer's mouse, or provide any other user input. When the user inserts the medical ID smart card into the smart card reader, patient health information and data stored on the smart card may be read as well as an extent of the medical coverage.

[0010] One particularly advantageous implementation of the present invention utilizes smart cards that have one or more contactless integrated circuit chips that include an antenna coil formed directly on the surface of the chip. Such a chip, called "Coil-on-Chip," has been developed by Maxell and is particularly useful in the medical ID smart card of the present invention because of improved durability and low cost. Two specific exemplary implementation options for the medical ID smart card of the present invention are:

[0011] 1) a medical ID smart card with one Coil-on-Chip (a standard PVC card with one embedded chip--for exemplary details refer to Appendix A of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/308,106); and

[0012] 2) a medical ID card with two Coil-on-Chips (a standard PVC card with embedded two chips--for exemplary details refer to Appendix B of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/308,106).

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF DRAWINGS

[0013] Other aspects and advantages of the present invention will become apparent upon reading the following detailed description and upon reference to the drawings, which are provided for illustration purposes only and should not be deemed to limit the scope of the present application, in which:

[0014] FIG. 1 is a block diagram illustrating an exemplary system for implementing principles of the present invention;

[0015] FIG. 2 illustrates, in more detail, one implementation for the exemplary system of FIG. 1;

[0016] FIG. 3 is a flow diagram illustrating functions of an implementation of the present invention for using a medical ID smart card to retrieve information from an extranet site or public web site set up by a medical service provider/card issuer;

[0017] FIG. 4 is a flow diagram illustrating functions of an implementation of principles of the present invention to retrieve additional information from a medical ID smart card; and

[0018] FIGS. 5A-5B illustrate an exemplary medical ID smart card in accordance with principles of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

[0019] The present invention facilitates health care insurance transactions, pharmaceutical services, and administration by providing a personalized smart card that is encoded with patient information, including patient identifying information, and a Uniform Resource Locator (URL) of an insurance provider's and/or a pharmaceutical service provider's extranet or a web site. Such a smart card is referred to herein as a "medical ID smart card."According to an aspect of the present invention, a computer-implemented method automatically navigates to a web site or a health insurance provider extranet site using the medical ID smart card to provide users (e.g., physicians, nurses, hospitals, pharmacies, etc.) with an easy way to access, verify, and update information needed to determine insurance coverage and other patient information. For this purpose, the medical ID smart card contains a computer-readable memory that is encoded with a Uniform Resource Locator (URL) of the web or extranet site. According to another aspect of the present invention, a computer-implemented method uses the medical ID smart card to automatically navigate to a pharmaceutical service provider's extranet/web site to provide the user with pharmaceutical information and services, such as allowing the user to access information indicating, e.g., which medications are covered by the patient's health care plan, the patient's pharmaceutical history, potential interactions/adverse affects of different drugs, whether a medication covered by the patient's health care plan may be substituted for the medicine the physician plans to prescribe, etc., and/or to electronically submit a pharmaceutical prescription.

[0020] The invention may be used by medical insurance providers, hospitals, physicians, pharmacies, government agencies, non-profit organizations, and other enterprises to provide customers, members, and other individuals with easy access to the enterprise's web or extranet for health insurance coverage, pharmaceutical services, and other related purposes. The medical ID smart card will also contain medical data for individual patients, members and other ID card holders.

[0021] The enterprise may be a card issuer and may:

[0022] Encode a personal patient code for each individual cardholder.

[0023] Encode vital medical data, permanent (read-only) and temporary (read & write).

[0024] Encode its extranet or/and web site's URL on a smart card.

[0025] Design print of the surface of the smart card, such as graphics and text content.

[0026] Select one chip or multiple (e.g., two) chip medical ID card design.

[0027] Because both the medical ID smart card and the process of encoding information on the medical ID smart card are relatively inexpensive, thousands of such smart cards may be manufactured relatively inexpensively and provided to many enterprises and individuals at low cost.

[0028] Medical insurance providers may issue medical ID smart cards to patients and insurance members, and also distribute a smart card reader to hospitals, physicians and pharmacies. Timely distribution and low cost of a particular model of a medical ID smart card and smart card reader may help to encourage the widespread adoption of those models of smart card and smart card reader.

[0029] The medical ID smart card manufacturer will make cards to issuers' specifications with encoding of the relevant URL (e.g., the insurance company's URL) onto the medical ID smart card and, optionally, physically imprinting the insurance provider's/pharmaceutical service provider's logo and/or other information on the face of the medical ID smart card. The card issuer, which in most instances will be the insurance provider, may encode personal data and information onto the medical ID smart card for each individual cardholder.

[0030] In a further embodiment of the present invention, the URL-encoded smart card contains personalized information tailored to the issuer and the owner of the smart card. For example, the medical ID smart card may contain a unique user ID identifying the owner of the smart card. The incorporation of such identifying information on the medical ID smart card may be used to enable various applications, such as tracking individual medical treatment, medication prescriptions and use of the owner of the medical ID smart card. Furthermore, the medical insurance providers may use the personalized information stored on the medical ID smart card to direct personalized medical care instructions for physicians, hospitals and pharmacies.

[0031] It should be appreciated that the various features of the present invention described above and described in more detail below provide numerous advantages. For example, medical enterprises and their administrative employees currently devote a significant portion of their workday to verifying patient's data over the phone and to sending and receiving faxes, as well as typing letters and e-mails to health enterprises who pay the bills. While using the medical ID card, telephone calls to the provider and endless faxing may be totally eliminated. The medical ID smart card may also minimize keyboard typing and inevitable typing mistakes. Furthermore, insertion of a medical ID smart card into a smart card reader or other appropriate device may be easier for users with physical disadvantages than typing or clicking.

[0032] Organizations may gradually replace their existing cards with medical ID smart cards in a manner that is minimally disruptive to card holders and the medical community. The card replacement may be orchestrated on geographical area bases. Such a practice is likely to meet with little resistance by the cardholders and the health enterprises.

[0033] As with currently issued insurance cards, the insured person carries the medical ID smart card with him/her. When entering a hospital and checking in, a nurse, doctor, pharmacist or other medical personnel may use a reader/writer and PC to review immediately the actual medical data stored on the card and also to navigate to the medical insurance provider dedicated web site/extranet. This may facilitate an instant verification of the medical insurance coverage and eliminate ongoing disputes between an insurance provider, doctor and the patient.

[0034] Current telephone and fax verification of medical coverage is slow and outdated. The supplier of a medical treatment often faces eventual disputes about payments for the given service especially in emergency situations. Medical organizations and insurance providers employ myriad collecting agencies to secure their payments. If, for example, the doctor used the medical ID smart card and found from the medical insurance provider extranet/web site that the medical coverage for the patient has expired, he/she can make an instant decision about an appropriate medical service and there would be no uncertain payment issue left for the future. The medical or health enterprise expense for payment-collecting agencies will be virtually eliminated.

[0035] At present, hospitals and doctors are flooded with paperwork and telephone calls, large volumes of medical documents being processed every day. By the nature of the medical ID smart card invention, the present labor intensive system may be changed and fewer administrative personnel may be required in the health industry sector. The insured individuals can easily carry the medical ID smart card in their wallets every day. Such a method of a personal ID, combined with the encoding of the issuer URL on the medical ID smart card for use in a variety of health organizations represents an improvement over existing techniques for health and medical personal identification. Furthermore, unlike conventional printed ID cards which rely on telephone and fax communication, the medical ID smart guarantees a seamless twenty four hour access to selected medical records and insurance coverage, as well as a list of medications covered by the health insurance provider. Currently, communication via telephone and fax is sometimes limited to work days and work hours. At present, medical coverage information during weekends and holidays is an issue in some cases.

[0036] A further problem faced by the health service community is that an analog telephone and typed hard copy communication may result in incorrect data for a particular individual. The medical ID smart card of the present invention addresses this problem because digital data transfer and no type, no click smart card operation will result in an obtainment of an accurate medical data for each individual. This may result in fewer human mistakes and it may correspond to fewer legal proceedings between hospitals, physicians, patients and health insurance providers. This advantage may represent significant savings for legal and administrative fees. Freed funds can be used against the costs associated with the medical ID smart card implementation.

[0037] One particularly advantageous implementation of the present invention utilizes smart cards that have one or more contactless integrated circuit chips that include an antenna coil formed directly on the surface of the chip. Such a chip, called Coil-on-Chip, has been developed by Maxell and is particularly useful in the medical ID smart card of the present invention because of improved durability and low cost. Details of Maxell's Coil-on-Chip technology are provided in PCT application PCT/JP00/01029, the entire contents of which are herein incorporated by reference.

[0038] Two specific exemplary implementation options for the medical ID smart card of the present invention are:

[0039] 1) a medical ID smart card with one Coil-on-Chip (a standard PVC card with one embedded chip--for exemplary details refer to Appendix A of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/308,106); and

[0040] 2) a medical ID card with two Coil-on-Chips (a standard PVC card with embedded two chips--for exemplary details refer to Appendix B of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/308,106).

[0041] In the one chip implementation (e.g., 108 bytes, 1 kbytes, 2 kbytes, or 4 kbytes of memory), the memory chip may include both permanent patient data (e.g., name, social security number, insurance number, blood type, allergies, URL for service provider/card issuer, etc.) and temporary data (e.g., current medications, diagnoses, next scheduled visit, treatment, etc.). In the multiple chip implementation, a first chip may be used to store permanent patient data (read-only), and a second chip may store temporary patient data (read and write).

[0042] Health insurance enterprises (the providers) may take advantage of the inexpensive medical ID smart card. Advantageous features of the digital data transfer and information reception may encourage physicians and pharmacies to accept and to prefer the e-compatible insurance provider policy. Providers may acquire wider geographical coverage while their day-to-day operation expense may decline. Due to the personal data transfer automation, less wages may be required for health industry administrative personnel.

Applications

[0043] According to one application of principles of the present invention to medical health insurance transactions and administration, a basic medical ID smart card system includes media (i.e., contained in the medical ID smart card itself), a reader/writer, a host/PC, and a remote server (e.g., connected to a TCP/IP network such as the internet). An exemplary medical ID card system illustration is provided in FIG. 1, in which the system 100 includes: a medical ID smart card 110; a reader/writer module 120; and a host device 130 connected to the reader/writer module 120. In the system 100 of FIG. 1, the reader/writer module reads information from the smart card 110, for example to retrieve permanent and/or temporary patient data. As illustrated in FIG. 2, the smart card 110 may include one or more "Coil-on-Chip" contactless integrated circuit chips having an antenna coil 112, a control circuit 114, a memory 116, and a power generator 118. As also illustrated in FIG. 2, the reader/writer module 120, which may be a Pichochet.TM. reader/writer from Maxell, may include an antenna coil interface 122 and a transceiver 124 for reading data from/writing data to and providing power to the smart card 110, and a data transfer controller 126 for receiving data from/transferring data to the host device 130. The host device 130 may be for example a PC with a USB or RC-232C connection to the reader/writer module 120 and is connected to a computer network, e.g., the Internet, so as to connect to an extranet site or public web site of the card issuer/service provider.

[0044] In the present invention, the medical ID smart card may be encoded with personalized information that is tailored to and/or identifies the user and the issuer of the medical smart card. Such information may be automatically transmitted to the extranet or web site by the host device 130 and advantageously be used to personalize the content of the insurance member information. For example, the user's user name may be automatically transmitted to the web or extranet site, and web site's or extranet site's contents may be selected and/or personalized based on the provider's preferences, medical history, or demographic information. This functionality of the system may follow HIPPA regulations and professional practice.

[0045] Conventional techniques may be used to verify medical insurance coverage when a card reader/writer is not available at the medical service provider such as physician's office, hospital, pharmacy or other enterprise. Medical insurance telephone numbers may be printed on the medical ID smart card.

[0046] Various aspects, features, and characteristics of this application of the present invention will be described in more detail below. An exemplary implementation of principles of the present invention is illustrated in the flow chart of FIG. 3. Referring to FIG. 3, a diagram is shown that illustrates an exemplary flow of functions of the invention to view the health insurance provider policy and regulation on extranet or private web site.

[0047] Data transfer and communication starts by inserting a the medical ID smart card 110 into a card reader/writer module 120 (Step S210). Reader/writer module 120 reads the media of the medical ID smart card 110 and, via browser software of the host device 130, the encoded extranet or a web site location is found on a remote server. More specifically, the reader/writer module 120 reads a URL from the smart card 110 (Step S212) and also reads any necessary additional data from the smart card (Step S214). Upon receiving URL information from the reader/writer module 120, the host device 130 may automatically launch a web/extranet browser (Step S216) and navigate to the targeted URL (Step S218). Upon connecting to the targeted site indicated by the URL, the user of the host device 130 may access information (e.g., medical coverage information) from the targeted site (Step S220). Before viewing such information, the user may be required to confirm authorization for viewing the information. A conventional system may be employed to transmit information between a web/extranet client and web/extranet server over a TCP/IP network. The medical ID smart card 110 communicates with the reader/writer 120 and the reader/writer module 120 interfaces with the host device 130. A browser of the host device 130 may generate a request for the extranet or web page according to the Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP).

[0048] As discussed above, the system 100 may use a process to automatically navigate to the web site. When the user inserts the medical ID smart card 110 into the reader/writer module 120, the reader/writer module 120 detects that the medical ID smart card 110 has been inserted into and reads the encoded URL from the medical ID smart card 110.

[0049] FIG. 4 illustrates an exemplary method of reading any additional information from the smart card 110, such as a user name, medical insurance information, health data, etc. User access may be limited to selected and dedicated personnel, health industry professionals, or organizations that retain a medical card reader/writer. Technical provisions may be made by the medical ID smart card system issuer that only authorized personnel can access the system. The reader/writer and the card chip may contain permanent encryption that no other reader/writer can be used to enter the medical ID smart card data or non-authorized person cannot access the patients' records on a remote server or on the card media. In the process for reading additional information from the smart card 110 illustrated in FIG. 4, the medical ID smart card 110 is inserted into the card reader/writer module 120 (Step S310) and the reader/writer module 120 reads patient data from the card (Step S312). The host device 130, upon determining that a card is being read by the reader/writer module 120, launches software for accessing data from the card (Step S314). Specifically, the host device 130 instructs the reader/writer module 120 to retrieve permanent data (Step S316) and also may instruct the reader/writer module 120 to read/write temporary data from/to the smart card 110 (Step S320). Before accessing permanent data and/or temporary data, the user of the host device 130 may be required to establish authorization, thus permitting authorized personnel to review patient data and/or change temporary data stored on the card (Steps S318 and S322).

[0050] The medical ID smart card 110 implementation of FIG. 2 includes an integrated circuit that includes a memory module 116 for storing information. Stored in the memory module 116 is patient's data and URL. It should be appreciated that a variety of information may be stored on the medical ID smart card--for example, an access to a medical or health organization database. FIGS. 5A and 5B illustrate an exemplary medical ID smart card 110 in accordance with principles of the present invention. As shown in FIG. 5A, the exterior of the medical ID smart card 110 may include printed graphics and text, including the patient's name and service provider's name (e.g., insurer's name in the case of an insurance card). As shown in FIG. 5B, the memory of the medical ID smart card 110 may include both permanent and temporary information. As shown in FIG. 5B, the permanent data may include patient name, social security number, insurance group number, blood type, and URL for the service provider. The temporary data stored on the medical ID smart card 110 may include diagnosis information, as well as medications for the patient.

[0051] Again, the principles of the present invention may advantageously be implemented using new integrated circuit contactless chip technology that has been introduced as Coil-on-Chip by Maxell. Such an implementation is economical and, thus, an individual can carry the medical ID smart card in a wallet and any doctor's office or a hospital with a PC or other computer device can connect easily a smart card reader/writer as a computer peripheral. The Coil-on-Chip smart card does not require contact with the card reader/writer reading device. The chip is inside of the card--it is embedded in the plastic. Unlike common contact IC cards, the Coil-on-Chip smart card and the embedded chip cannot be damaged. The chip does not peel off from the PVC card surface. Wear and tear is the major disadvantage for the contact IC chips presently offered in smart cards. The Coil-on-Chip smart cards are durable and applicable for frequent usage such as carrying ID card in a wallet, packet, etc.

[0052] This invention and the above-described microchip card technology will result in a less labor intensive operation and decrease costs associated with the current enormous administrative system. Fewer mistakes will be made, which is an important factor for the medical field. Better and quicker medical services will be the final outcome of the medical ID smart card system.

[0053] The health insurance provider web or extranet site may deny user's (hospital, doctor, pharmacy) access to the medical records of an individual with the medical ID card. If the patient's medical insurance coverage has expired or was canceled, the particular patient records may not be available online. For example, this may provide an instant verification of the medical insurance coverage, instead of an insurance policy display on the screen of PC there may be a warning sign indicating that the coverage is no longer available. In the majority of cases in the U.S., medical insurance is offered to individuals by their employers. When employment of an employee is ceased for any reason, the person's medical coverage is either canceled or continues for a limited time. The present, no microchip health insurance card, remains in the former employee possession. A hospital or physician may accept this no longer valid card and then have payment issues later after the treatment.

[0054] When the medical ID smart card of the present invention is used, and access to the verification web site is denied, users (doctor, hospital or other dedicated personnel) may have a chance to contact the insurance company via telephone and it may be the physician's decision about treatment or medication when medical coverage is not confirmed. It should be appreciated that an instant ID validity may be available by enabling this particular online access functionality of this invention. The new system of instant medical coverage verification may save hospital and doctors' funds for after the fact administrative efforts to get payments for services already provided. Funds from these cost savings may be applied against the medical ID smart card system hardware and software on the hospital or physician's business side.

[0055] The smart card reader may be any device that is capable of accessing information on the smart card and transmitting such information to the client computer. The smart card reader may be capable of reading information from the smart card, writing information to the smart card, or both. The smart card reader may be a contact smart card reader or a contactless smart card reader, as appropriate. The smart card reader may be connected to the client computer using any form of connection, such as a serial cable, parallel cable, Universal Serial Bus (USB) cable, or wireless connection.

[0056] As described above, the smart card reader driver enables communication between the smart card reader and the client, medical insurance provider, and computer. The smart card reader driver may be implemented in any manner to transmit information to and/or to read information from the smart card reader on behalf of the client computer. Once software installed, the smart card reader driver provides an Application Program Interface (API) through which application programs, such as medical data specific software and/or the web browser launcher, may communicate with the smart card reader.

[0057] The host of the smart card system can be a computer or device incorporating a computer processor, such as a desktop computer, laptop computer, etc. The web or extranet browser may be any web browser or other HTTP client and may be implemented in hardware, software, firmware, or any combination thereof.

[0058] The TCP/IP network used to exchange information between the host computer and the accessed server may be any network, internet (such as the public Internet), intranet, extranet, subnetwork, or combination thereof that is capable of transmitting communications according to TCP/IP. The web browser or extranet browser and the server may be connected to the TCP/IP network in any manner, such as by standard analog telephone lines, optical fiber, or a wireless network.

[0059] Another application of the principles of the present invention relates to pharmaceutical services. In this application, the medical ID smart card is also/alternatively encoded with the URL for an extranet/web site of a pharmaceutical service provider. When the browser is launched to navigate to the pharmaceutical service provider's URL, the user may access information indicating, e.g., which medications are covered by the patient's insurance, the patient's pharmaceutical history, potential interactions/adverse affects of different drugs, whether a medication covered by the patient's health care plan may be substituted for the one the physician plans to prescribe, etc., and/or to electronically submit a pharmaceutical prescription. In this way, the process of prescribing drugs is facilitated and accuracy (i.e., safety) may be improved.

[0060] In general, the techniques described above may be implemented, for example, in hardware, software, firmware, or any combination thereof. The techniques described above may be implemented in one or more computer programs executing on a programmable computer including a processor, a storage medium readable by the processor (including, for example, volatile and non-volatile memory and/or storage elements), at least one input device, and at least one output device. Program code may be applied to data entered using the input device to perform the functions described and to generate output information. The output information may be applied to one or more output devices.

[0061] Elements and components described herein may be further divided into additional components or joined together to form fewer components for performing the same functions.

[0062] Each computer program within the scope of the claims below may be implemented in any programming language, such as assembly language, machine language, a high-level procedural programming language, or an object-oriented programming language. The programming language may be a compiled or interpreted programming language.

[0063] Each computer program may be implemented in a computer program product tangibly involved in a machine-readable storage device for execution by a computer processor. Method steps of the invention may be performed by a computer processor executing a program tangibly embodied on a computer-readable medium to perform functions of the invention by operating on input and generating output.

[0064] It is to be understood that although the invention has been described above in terms of particular basic concept, the foregoing embodiments are provided as illustrative only, and do not limit or define the scope of the invention. Other embodiments are also within the scope of the present invention, which is defined by the scope of the claims below. Other embodiments that fall within the scope of the following claims includes include, but are not limited to, the following.

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Smart card makes medical historyhttp://www.zdnet.com.au/news/0,39023165,20243364,00.htm


18 July 2001 04:45 PM

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University of Newcastle researchers are hoping to commercialise a 'smart card' that can hold a person's entire medical history on a piece of plastic the size of a credit card.

The card uses a double password, layered security system including encrypted and encoded data, and can store up to 512 health records and that same number of prescription records.

The research is headed by Associate Professor Sajeev who says the card could revolutionise health care – the University is looking for a financial backer to take over the commercial development of the successful prototype.

The card, called MoReHealth (Mobile Records for better Health), is a miniature computer with memory and processor.

It stores the patient’s medical history so that a doctor or hospital anywhere in the world has ready access to their records through a smart card reader and a desktop PC with MoReHealth software.

Professor Sajeev said the card could be integrated with a patient’s Medicare card to store billing information as well.

He said researchers had been able to convince doctors who had seen the card that it had sufficient privacy protection.

Data would not be able to be edited without a password from both the doctor and the patient, or their guardian or carer, and would be stored on the card using a medical coding system, which would then be encrypted.

Doctors and pharmacists would require special software that would only be issued to bona fide practitioners, to translate the data on the card.

Pharmacists would only have access to the prescription details and not to the medical records, according to Professor Sajeev.

If the patient was treated by a doctor other than their family physician the card would be updated and an encrypted back-up copy would be sent to the family doctor via the Internet so no records would be lost if the card was stolen or mislaid.

“We want to talk to the government, the health industry and others with the idea of getting some backing and forming a consortium to commercialise the card,” Professor Sajeev said.

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In the movie black hawk down, an interesting sceen show an offices who wrote his blood type, blood group and taped it on his boots, this he did in case of accident where he gets injured, they can give adequate treatment on time without wasting valuable and expensive time.Just one second makes a lot of difference in his case if blood is needed,he has already provided an information of his blood to them, .

The smartcardcome very handy to solving the question of time and saving lifes.

 


Storing and Accessing Critical Medical Informationhttp://www.avesodisplays.com/sol/smart_cards.html


Smart cards are regarded as technology that can help organizations meet HIPAA privacy and security requirements, while helping health care organizations improve efficiency, lower administrative costs and improve patient access to medical care. Smart cards also represent a convenient way to carry data between systems or to sites without systems. Smart health care cards of the future, enabled by Aveso printed electronic displays, will allow the user to generate and view critical information directly on the card itself, including:

• passwords for access to medical records
• insurance and benefits information
• key personal information
• medical information and history

 

 

 

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Smart Card Applications

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Overview | History | Technology | Applications | Card OS | Standards | Links

This section describes why organizations should consider using smart cards. We explain the key advantages of smart card technology and point out the current obstacles to acceptance of smart card technology. Finally we give examples of where smart cards are being used today

Application Areas

The first chip cards were simple prepaid telephone cards implemented in Europe in the mid-1980s, using memory cards. Today, the major active application areas for microprocessor-based smart cards include: financial, communications, government programs, information security, physical access security, transportation, retail and loyalty, health care, and university identification. These are intersecting areas in that the smart card may carry applications from more than one area (for example, combining information and physical security access, or financial and retail/loyalty). Here are some industries and their applications:

Industry

Application

Accountants

Business cards, client id, promotions, calendar cards

Airports

Employee access cards, security ID badges

Associations Memberships

Identification cards (ID cards), point of sale (POS) discounts, calendar cards

Automobile dealers

VIN ID cards, dealer loyalty, discounts, warranty cards

Bars, nightclubs

VIP cards, preferred door entry, membership cards

Car Wash

Frequency cards, pre-paid car wash cards

Clubs

Membership cards

Computers

Warranty card, customer support, internet access#'s, discounts

Dry Cleaners

Discount cards, frequent customer cards

Golf Courses

Membership cards, bag tags, prepaid greens, ball dispensers

Hotels

Discount, frequency cards, key cards, employee ID badges

Investment

Customer cards, calendar cards

Library

ID cards, bar codes

Real Estate

Business cards, telephone cards, calendar cards

Rental Services

Identification, preferred entry

Restaurants

Promotional, discount, membership, loyalty, preferred customer cards

Retail

Customer cards, cheque cashing, discount & loyalty cards

Security

Access control, name badges

Shopping Centers

Customer, discount cards, loyalty programs

Travel Agents

Telephone cards, customer cards

 

Why Consider Smart Cards?

A rule of thumb useful to organizations considering the incorporation of smart card technology into their operations states the following:

IF

bullet A portable record of one or more applications is necessary or desirable.
bullet The records are likely to require updating over time.
bullet The records will interface with more than one automated system.
bullet Security and confidentiality of the records are important.

THEN

The smart card is a feasible automation solution for making data processing and data transfer more efficient and secure.

Advantages of Smart Cards

The key advantages of smart card technology include:

bullet The capacity provided by the on-board microprocessor and data capacity for highly secure, off-line processing.
bullet Adherence to international standards, ensuring multiple vendor sources and competitive prices.
bullet Established track record in real world applications.
bullet Durability and long expected life span (guaranteed by vendor for up to 10,000 read/writes before failure).
bullet Chip Operating Systems that support multiple applications and secure independent data storage on one single card.

Barriers to Acceptance of Smart Cards

The current obstacles to acceptance of smart card technology include:

bullet Relatively higher cost of smart cards as compared to magnetic stripe cards. (The difference in initial costs between the two technologies, however, decreases significantly when the differences in expected life span and capabilities--particularly in terms of supporting multiple applications and thus affording cost sharing among application providers--are taken into account.)
bullet Present lack of infrastructure to support the smart card, particularly in the United States, necessitating retrofitting of equipment such as vending machines, ATMs, and telephones.
bullet Proprietary nature of the Chip Operating System. The consumer must be technically knowledgeable to select the most appropriate card for the target application.
bullet Lack of standards to ensure interoperability among varying smart card programs.
bullet Unresolved legal and policy issues, such as those related to privacy and confidentiality, or to consumer protection laws.

Comparison with Magnetic Stripe Cards

The increasing complex performance and application requirements of today's card systems have spurred interest in smart cards as an alternative to magnetic stripe cards, or as an enhancement to magnetic stripe cards in the form of a hybrid card. A hybrid card supports more than one technology as, for example, a smart card micro-module and a magnetic stripe.

Applications Areas

Shown below are examples of smart card applications.

Financial Applications

bullet Electronic Purse to replace coins for small purchases in vending machines and over-the-counter transactions.
bullet Credit and/or Debit Accounts, replicating what is currently on the magnetic stripe bank card, but in a more secure environment.
bullet Securing payment across the Internet as part of Electronic Commerce.

Communications Applications

bullet The secure initiation of calls and identification of caller (for billing purposes) on any Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) phone.
bullet Subscriber activation of programming on Pay-TV.

Government Programs

bullet Electronic Benefits Transfer using smart cards to carry Food Stamp and WIC food benefits in lieu of paper coupons and vouchers.
bullet Agricultural producer smart marketing card to track quotas.

Information Security

bullet Employee access card with secured passwords and the potential to employ biometrics to protect access to computer systems.

Physical Access

bullet Employee access card with secured ID and the potential to employ biometrics to protect physical access to facilities.

Transportation

bullet Drivers Licenses.
bullet Mass Transit Fare Collection Systems.
bullet Electronic Toll Collection Systems.

Retail and Loyalty

bullet Consumer reward/redemption tracking on a smart loyalty card, that is marketed to specific consumer profiles and linked to one or more specific retailers serving that profile set.

Health Card

bullet Consumer health card containing insurance eligibility and emergency medical data.

University Identification

bullet All-purpose student ID card (a/k/a/ campus card) , containing a variety of applications such as electronic purse (for vending and laundry machines), library card, and meal card.

Applications in the U.S.

Because of the significant investment in an extensive magnetic stripe-based infrastructure, and the availability of reliable and low cost on-line telecommunication services, the U.S. has thus far represented a limited smart card market. Smart card projects implemented in the U.S. have been primarily closed systems deployed on military bases, universities, and corporate campuses. The exception to this has been the movement by the Federal Government to use smart cards in Electronic Benefits Transfers for food stamps and other similar social programs nationwide.

The Federal Government's ultimate goal is to adopt a limited number of multi-application smart cards that will support a wide range of Government-wide and agency-specific services. It is envisioned that eventually every Federal employee will carry smart cards that can be used for multiple purposes such as identification, building access, network access, property accountability, travel, and other administrative and financial functions.

This completes Smart Card Technology, an on-line multimedia presentation, presented by the General Services Administration. We hope you have enjoyed this presentation and you will take time to explore the SmartGov Web site where you will find the latest in smart card news and information.

The introduction of smart cards to personal computing is probably the most exciting change in digital history. We believe that smart cards and other systems with a security microcontroller will literally be the key to the access and exchange of digital data over the Internet. It took more than thirty years from the initial idea of two German engineers in 1967/68 to the sophisticated systems that are available today. Smart card technology came a long way since introduction in the sixties. It is hard to imagine that the little piece of silicon, embedded in a credit card size plastic already has the calculating power of computers in the seventies.

Yearly billions of cards are deployed worldwide, mainly in Europe and Asia. We think that this trend will contibue and smart cards will take off in the United States. Currently millions of cards are deployed in the U.S., mainly by the banking industry. But can't be long until everyone has a card in her wallet, be it for banking, healthcare, electronic ID, cell phone identifier or web access token.

Smart cards (a/k/a: chip or integrated circuit cards or ICCs) are plastic cards containing a microcontroller. The embedded microcontroller transforms a credit card-sized piece of plastic into a portable, tamper-resistant computer with a calculating power of the original IBM PC. Although most smart cards still use 8-bit microcontrollers, 32-bit systems already line up for next generation cards. The same happens with the available on-card memory, which quickly becomes larger.

Typically, the only visible difference, is a set of golden electrical contact pads. For contactless smart cards however, it would be hard to notice the difference to a regular credit card. Those cards contain an antenna rather than the golden contact pads of regular smart cards.

Smart cards have diffused worldwide in the form of prepaid and reloadable payment, telephone, travel, and most recently, health care, cards. It is the latest advance in payment card technology, user authentication and access control to computer systems.

Smart cards can only be as intelligent as their designers and consumers make and use them. Card issuers, on and off-card software developers and card holders still bear responsibilities.

A vast variety of suppliers is out there. This can be overwelming and the differences between various products are often hidden behind colorful sales brochures. Furthermore the fight over industry standards is not over and doesn't contribute to clarity in this regards. This site gives you some starting points that hopefully help to get a good overview. We also offer consulting services and will help you choosing the right system for your needs

smart card technologysmart card operating systems

Part of this page is an excerpt from U.S. General Services Administration Smart Card Tutorial

 

 

 

 

 

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The Medical History ID Card Could Save Your Life! http://www.medicalhistorycard.com/

Medical History Wallet Card
For: Emergency Care - Seizures - Drug Allergies - Diabetes - Prosthetics


We offer:
- education programs
- group / company sales
- personal safety
- family discounts
- physician programs

Please review the sections below for more information.

 


The Medical History Card Could Save Your Life!
The ability to quickly and clearly communicate essential medical information to emergency care providers and medical personnel can be the lifesaver for you and for your family.

But what happens if you are unable to communicate? The Medical History Card provides a simple, affordable, and effective solution. The durable plastic wallet-sized card is convenient to carry at all times, and is clearly formatted to provide a wealth of important information, including emergency and physician contacts, blood type, medications, pre existing conditions, and more.
When time can make a difference between life and death, the Medical History Card quickly and clearly communicates essential medical information, such as allergies and sensitivities, to 'on scene' emergency care providers and medical personnel so treatment begins without delay, wherever you are!

The Medical History Card is ideal for people with medical conditions — from allergies to heart disease — and can make a difference for you & your loved ones when critical seconds separate life and death. Seniors, students, travelers, and sports enthusiasts alike will find the Medical History Card a simple and effective personal safety solution. 

Ordering Info | About | FAQ | Contact Us

 

The Medical History ID Card Could Save Your Life!

Medical History Wallet Card
For: Emergency Care - Seizures - Drug Allergies - Diabetes - Prosthetics


We offer:
- education programs
- group / company sales
- personal safety
- family discounts
- physician programs

Please review the sections below for more information.

 


The Medical History Card Could Save Your Life!
The ability to quickly and clearly communicate essential medical information to emergency care providers and medical personnel can be the lifesaver for you and for your family.

But what happens if you are unable to communicate? The Medical History Card provides a simple, affordable, and effective solution. The durable plastic wallet-sized card is convenient to carry at all times, and is clearly formatted to provide a wealth of important information, including emergency and physician contacts, blood type, medications, pre existing conditions, and more.
When time can make a difference between life and death, the Medical History Card quickly and clearly communicates essential medical information, such as allergies and sensitivities, to 'on scene' emergency care providers and medical personnel so treatment begins without delay, wherever you are!

The Medical History Card is ideal for people with medical conditions — from allergies to heart disease — and can make a difference for you & your loved ones when critical seconds separate life and death. Seniors, students, travelers, and sports enthusiasts alike will find the Medical History Card a simple and effective personal safety solution. 

Ordering Info | About | FAQ | Contact Us

 

 

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